The World War 1 Forum (Page 21)

How To Contact Someone on this forum Please Read
To find your Own Messages search for the name you originally used.
This forum supports the Royal British Legion so please donate.
Please reply to anyone you can help!

The forum has 315 pages containing 3146 messages
-10   Prev Page   17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25   Next Page   10+

Posted by: Lorri {Email left}
Location: Knottingley
Date: Sunday 3rd July 2016 at 12:21 AM
Hi I am trying to find out about my great grand father war service, I don't have very much information on him and have been looking for a very long time with no results. I have looked online but no joy. There seems to be a few with the same name but I can't work it out. My mum lived with him and the bits she can remember she has told me.
His name was James Henry Lee born in 1874, lived in Leeds Yorkshire and he said he was in the Boer war and also was in Leeds Rifles. Mum said he had medals she was to get after he died but she never got them.
Mum also said he talked about KOYLI but not sure if he was in this or a brother.
Not much is known other than he was in France he was gassed at some stage and that someone from the Army ? came to his house to say that he had been killed but he wasn't, his unit had come down with measles and it was the other unit that got wiped out and he was fine.
I would be most grateful if you could help me out.
Regards
Lorri
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd July 2016 at 6:29 PM

Dear Lorri,
No individual service record has survived for James Henry Lee born 1874 so it is not possible to state his service in any detail. The majority of service records from the First World War were destroyed in the London Blitz of September 1940. The “Leeds Rifles” consisted of two battalions each of a thousand men. These were the 7th and the 8th Battalions of the Prince of Wales’s Own (West Yorkshire) Regiment, based, not surprisingly, in Leeds, at Carlton Barracks as part of the pre-war Territorial Army. There are three nominal rolls that might identify James Henry Lee of the West Yorkshire Regiment; however they list three men with the same name in the same regiment. Helpfully, a War Badge roll records a James Henry Lee who was discharged through sickness at the age of 43 in 1917, which would give him a birth year of 1874. The other two men named James Henry Lee were in their twenties.
It therefore seems likely the James Henry Lee who was discharged in 1917 was your great grandfather.
However, there is some contradiction in the surviving records. The nominal roll of the silver “War Badge” was roll number O/65/2 which recorded James Henry Lee with the regimental number 268389 in the 7th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment who enlisted on 13th October 1914 and was discharged through sickness on 21st August 1917 aged 43. His previous regimental number was shown as 7363, which appears to be incorrect. The War Badge was issued to James Lee on 6th October 1917. The War Badge was a silver badge to be worn on civilian clothing to indicate a man had served King and Country and had been discharged before the end of the war.
The reason there were two regimental numbers was that in January 1917 all Territorial Force soldiers were allotted new six-digit numbers during a rationalisation of the number system. The regimental number 268389 was in the batch 265001 to 305000 allocated to the 7th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment.
An Army medal rolls index-card recorded James H. Lee as 268389 West Yorkshire Regiment with the previous number 2686. This card also showed he was named on the Silver War Badge list numbered 0/65/2, which indicates he is the same James Henry Lee, born 1874, but with a different previous number.
The nominal rolls for the 1914-15 Star medal, recorded J.H. Lee 2686 entered France on 16th April 1915 and was discharged with the number 268389. The entry did not state in which battalion he served, but this entry is specific about the two numbers.
The combined nominal roll for the British War Medal and Victory Medal recorded James Henry Lee, 2686 and 268389 served in the 8th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment.
There is no entry in the rolls for Lee with the number 7363 mentioned above, so that can be discounted as an error. The weight of evidence is that James’s regimental numbers were 2686 and then 268389.
But, which battalion did he serve in?
Both the 7th and 8th Battalions sailed for France from Folkestone and landed at Boulogne in the early hours of 16th April 1915, so the date on the medal index-card is not helpful. It is possible he served with the 8th Battalion and was posted to the 7th Battalion at some stage. Or the medal roll was wrong in stating he served with the 8th Battalion.
Certainly, his regimental number after January1917 was 268389 which was a 7th Battalion number and he was discharged from the 7th Battalion according to the War Badge roll.
As it was, the 7th and 8th Battalions served alongside each other with the 146th (West Riding) Infantry Brigade in the 49th (West Riding) Division. While the battalions fought in the same Brigade, their wartime experiences were not identical, as, for example on July 1st 1916, the individual companies fought under different conditions until 9 p.m., and one group of 30 men of the 7th Battalion became isolated for two days.
The wartime engagements of the 7th and 8th Battalions can be seen on Chris Baker’s website, The Long, Long Trail at:
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/49th-west-riding-division/
Those engagements up to mid-1917 would have involved James Henry Lee.
James Henry Lee was discharged from the army because of illness on 21st August 1917, so he had probably spent some time in hospital before that date. Perhaps gas was the cause?
The incident about the man calling to say James was dead appears to be justified. A soldier named James Lee, from Leeds, of the 7th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment, was killed in action on 14th July 1916. His regimental number in the 7th Battalion was 2986 compared with James Henry Lee’s number 2686.
Few Boer War records have survived and James Henry or J.H. Lee does not appear to be among them.
James Henry Lee qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. The medals would have been despatched automatically to his address in 1920/1921.
Had a man moved address in the years between 1918 and 1921 it is possible the medals could not be delivered and they would be returned to the local infantry record office to be held for one year after which they were returned to the War Office Medals Branch to be destroyed at the mint.
The “Leeds Rifles” are well represented on the internet.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Pat {No contact email}
Location: East Yorkshire
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 9:52 PM
Dear Alan,
I wonder if you can help me sort out members of my grandfather's family, which is causing my a lot of problems.
My grandfather was Frederick born in 1894 in Hull to Frederick Wilson and Frances Elizabeth (Johnson) I believe he enlisted into the Northumberland Fusiliers 35th Battalion.No 86626, and I would like to know more about his time during service, which may confirm that Frederick and Frances are his next of kin.
He had a brother George born 1898. I have traced a George Wilson serving as a gunner No 33097 in the Machine Gun Corps, and I am sure these are the two brothers I am looking for. Would you please be able to prove or disprove my thoughts?
Many thanks
Pat
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 11:11 PM

Dear Pat,
There are no surviving individual army service records that provide biographical information about Frederick or George Wilson, so it is not possible to establish a relationship. The 35th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers did not serve overseas and remained in the UK at Herne Bay and then was at Westlerton from early 1918.
Alan
Reply from: Pat
Date: Sunday 3rd July 2016 at 5:48 PM

Thank you. Sorry there are no individual records, so I shall just have to keep on searching.
Are there are records for these men that I may keep on record, just in case I come up with something, which may help in my search?

Kind regards

Pat
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 3rd July 2016 at 6:28 PM

There are no records for Frederick Wilson 86626 Northumberland Fusiliers. There is a medal rolls index-card for George Wilson Machine Gun Corps 33097 which records he qualified for the British War medal and the Victory medal, but that is all it says. Medal index cards are available from the ancestry.co.uk subscription website although many libraries have free access to the website.
Most individual service records were destroyed in the London Blitz in 1940 so they have not survived.
With kind regards,
Alan

Posted by: Bella {Email left}
Location: Esher
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 12:09 PM
Dear Alan,
Just want to mention how the commemorations of 100 years since WW1 have been portrayed.

For me I think it has been done with great dignity and particularly those who re-enacted soldiers going off to war at cities all over the UK which I am sure most of us found greatly moving. I am a little surprised though that the film 'Oh What a Lovely War' hasn't appeared on our screens which is very poignant at any time but particularly now.

Hope you are keeping well.

With kind regards.
Bella
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 2:02 PM

Dear Bella,
The BBC celebrated “Oh What a Lovely War” in 2014, the centenary of the start of the war, so they’ve probably out it on hold for 2018. There’s a brief background film at:
www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zws9xnb
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 9th July 2016 at 3:26 PM

Dear Bella,
You would enjoy this one hour documentary about "The Long, Long Trail" which was the inspiration for "Oh What a Lovely War". It's on the BBC iPlayer Radio at:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03nrn9m
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Karen Draper {Email left}
Location: Langton By Wragby
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 8:06 AM
Hi Alan
What a wonderful memorial to our brave men and women.
My Gran's cousin was killed in WW1. I am off to France
tomorrow to pay my respects but wondered if you could offer any further
information on him?

Private H Grant 14685 Coldstream Guards
Died 11/3/1918 Aged 22

Kind regards Karen
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 2:03 PM

Dear Karen,
The Coldstream Guards keep their own records and will conduct a search on application and payment of a fee of £33. See:
https://www.coldstreamguards.org.uk/histories-of-the-coldstream-guards/archives.html
H. Grant was Harry Grant. An army medal roll recorded he went to France on 15th August 1915 in the 4th Battalion Coldstream Guards. The Battalion was raised at Windsor in July 1915 as a pioneer (labour) battalion but soon became the 4th Battalion and served in the Guards Division in France and Flanders from 15th August 1915. The Battalion fought at The Battle of Loos, 1915; The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of Morval, 1916; The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Pilkem, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Poelkapelle, The First Battle of Passchendaele, and The Battle of Cambrai, 1917. The date of Harry Grant’s death did not coincide with any major engagement. He was buried at Fampoux, a commune that was taken by the Germans in their advance on 25th March 1918, two weeks after Harry Grant was killed.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Karen Draper
Date: Thursday 7th July 2016 at 6:52 PM

Thank you very much Alan.
I went to Fampoux. A very peaceful setting down a narrow country lane.
I found Harry - and said a prayer for him and the other brave men who lie
along with him.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 7th July 2016 at 7:57 PM

I am pleased to have helped, Karen.
Alan
Posted by: Dave Cox {Email left}
Location: Bedford
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 10:29 PM
Hi wonder if you can help me again looking for Fredrick Church born 1891 Bedford have one possible army reference norfolk regiment no. 20865 next of kin would be ruth church home address 8 beaconsfield street bedford
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 11:23 AM

Dear Dave,
There is no individual service record for Frederick Church so it is not possible to state his wartime service. A medal roll for a Frederick Charles Church recorded he qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal with the 1st Battalion Norfolk Regiment but the entry was marked “cancelled”, so it is not certain he served with that battalion. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, this man did not go abroad until some date after January 1st 1916. As the 1st Battalion Norfolk Regiment had been in France and Flanders since August 1914, Frederick Charles Church might have been part of a draft of reinforcements in later years.
As there is no surviving military record to provide any biographical details, it is not possible to state this was the Frederick Church who was the son of Ruth.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Margaret {Email left}
Location: Northampton
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 9:26 PM
Hi Alan,

I am researching all of my Uncles/Great Uncles and Grandfathers/Great-Grandfathers that fought in WW1 and WW2. I am working down the list one by one and I would love to know about my uncle Jack Nicholls, who fought in WW2. I know that this is a WW1 Forum, but I have searched and searched and cannot find any forums where I can ask about WW2 soldiers. I do understand if you cannot help me, but if I don’t ask, then I won’t receive!

So… here’s my uncle’s details: -

Jack Nicholls Birth date: 14 July 1915

Royal Regiment of Artillery: A175-55. LAA. REG: R.A. 1609754 Gnr. Nicholls. B/165/55. A. A/A. TK Reg R.A. India Command, India & South East Asia Command.

The above details have been copied from letters/cards sent home during WW2. I think they transcribe as

Info from Carol:
Dads army number :  A. 165-55 LAA. Reg  R. A. 
The address mum sent his letters to :
1609754 Gnr Nicholls
B/165/55 A.  A/A.   To Reg R.A.
India Command 
India.

UNIT: ROYAL ARTILLERY
RANK: GUNNER - BOMBARDIER - LANCE BOMBARDIER - SERGEANT
RECORD YEAR: 1939 - 1945

POSSIBLY ANTI-AIRCRAFT BRANCH = A/A

My cousin did think that her dad was a Sergeant at one point, but Gnr. indicates to me that he was a Gunner, not sure! She does know that he lost a stripe in 1940, as he was about to be drafted out to Burma (I have since found out that he was actually sent to Ceylon), but he received news that his daughter had been born and went A.W.O.L. because he knew that if he didn’t see his daughter before he went to war, he may never see his daughter (his father was shot in the chest during WW1 but survived, but his uncle died in WW1).

As it happened he did see his daughter again, but it was 4 years later! My cousin (especially) and I, would love to know what Jack was doing and where Jack was during his four years away from his family. We have both watched programs about Burma and don’t expect to hear that he had a wonderful time there, but it is very important and close to our hearts that we know what he saw and had to endure.

We do have various letters/Christmas cards that was sent home during his time at war, but my cousin says that on his return, he never spoke a word about his time away fighting. All she can remember is that her father would wake up crying out (having nightmares) in the night, wet through with sweat and her mother would have to comfort him. Still he kept silent.

My cousin, always thought that her father spent the whole four years of his war years in Burma, but after digging out all the old war letters etc., it seems that initially he was in Ceylon, then India and then Burma. Jack did receive the Burma Star. He may have been awarded other medals, but that is the only medal my cousin remembers for sure that her father got. We do have a photograph of Jack with four Gurkha’s stood behind him which Carol believes was in Burma.

My father, Jack’s youngest brother, says that his brother Jack, ended his war years in Germany.

We (my cousin and I) would love to know the exact itinerary of Jack’s war years, what battles he fought and under what circumstances he had to live. It is very important to us.

I have tried to research the Battalion or battery uncle Jack was in, but it seems they changed names three or four times as one joined another etc., and I didn’t really understand all of the terms used in the websites I found this information. I am hoping to find some expert advice.

I have seen posts where the order of battles has been described, so if there is anyone out there that can give us as much detail about Jack and his military history, we would be extremely appreciative.

Sorry this is a long one, but I just wanted to give all the information I have. Don’t expect a reply immediately as this is a tall order!

Also, I have seen posts where people have mentioned they have given a donation, but I cannot see on this website where I can make a donation. As I do appreciate that you have helped me with several of my ancestors, I would like to give a donation, so if you would be so kind as to tell me how I can do this.

Kindest Regards, Margaret
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 11:22 AM

Dear Margaret,
Records of soldiers who served in the Second World War are not in the public domain and are held securely by the Ministry of Defence. The MoD may release details to the immediate next-of-kin of a deceased soldier on application and the payment of a fee of £30. They might release limited information to a general enquirer. You would need to provide proof of the former soldier’s death if he did not die in service. See:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records#service-records-of-deceased-service-personnel
I do not research the Second World War records.
Gunner Nichols’ army service number was 1609754. He would have been enlisted as a gunner (private soldier) and could have progressed through the ranks to the rank of Sergeant. The translation of his address B/165-55 LAA is “B” Troop of 165th Battery of the 55th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment of the Royal Artillery (R.A.).
On 18th June 1942, the 55 LAA Regiment R.A. arrived in Ceylon from England. On 1st August 1943 the Regiment arrived at Calcutta in India having moved from Ceylon. Very swiftly, on the 9th August 1943, the Regiment was converted to the 55th Light Anti-Aircraft/Anti-tank Regiment of the Royal Artillery (55 LAA/Atk Reg R.A.) which was formed by combining the 165 and 524 Light Anti-Aircraft Batteries and the 203 and 290 Anti-Tank Batteries formerly of the 56th Anti-Tank Regiment.
The new 55th LAA/Atk Regiment Royal Artillery was then stationed at Calcutta from 9th August 1943 under the command of the 20th Indian Infantry Division (20 Ind Inf Div). On 5th October 1943 the 20th Indian Infantry Division moved to Ranchi and on 1st December 1943 it moved to Imphal on the Burma - Assam border. The famous Battle of Imphal took place around the city of Imphal, the capital of the state of Manipur in North-east India, between March and July 1944.
On 1st September 1944, 55 LAA/Atk Regiment was re-designated as 111 Anti-Tank Regiment Royal Artillery, less 524 Battery, under 20th Indian Infantry Division and was located at Yaripok (Imphal) on 1st September 1944. In December 1944 the Regiment moved to Nakala, Khamphat and Kalemyo in Burma. On 31st January 1945, the 111 Anti-Tank Regiment was at Budalin; 31st March 1945 at Myitha; 30th April 1945 at Ingon and 20th June 1945 at Taikkyi.
Donations to the Royal British Legion can be made from the link at the top of the page.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Margaret
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 9:28 PM

Alan... You astound me! You are so good and accurate and I am amazed! I have just emailed your information to my cousin Carol, and I know she will be delighted to see the information you have provided. I have just looked back on cards/letters from uncle Jack and he has different ranks along the way. These are notes I have made in my personal journal of correspondence we received from uncle Jack i.e.

03 May 1942:  Post card from India, addressed to Nan & Grandad, Mr. & Mrs. F. Nicholls, signed L/BDR J. Nicholls

Aug 31 1943:  Letter to sister Betty.  Address the letter was sent from:  1609754.GNR NICHOLLS.J. B/165/55.A.A/A.Tk. REG.R.A. INDIA COMMAND INDIA.

02 July 1944:  Letter to sister Betty. 1609754.BDR.J.NICHOLLS.B/165/55. L.A.A/A/Tk: REGT: R.A.  S.E.A.C. (SOUTH EAST ASIA COMMAND)

1945 Christmas Card.  This card has the initials B.A.O.R. (BRITISH ARMY OF THE RHINE)

This is how I came to the conclusion that uncle Jack had different ranks when he moved around from one place to another, i.e. L/BDR then GNR, then BDR. I cannot see where he might have been a Sergeant, but Carol thought he was.

May I ask if there is a website that I can find out all this information that you have given me about WW2 soldiers, as I still need to research Jack's two younger brothers, Frank Nicholls and Herbert Nicholls, also from WW2. They are:-

HERBERT NICHOLLS
REGIMENT: YORK AND LANCASTER
UNIT: WEST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT
RANK: PRIVATE
SERVICE NUMBER: 4542561

FRANK NICHOLLS
1090010 L.A.C.NICHOLLS 223 SQDR. R.A.. C.M.F
ALSO ON ANOTHER LETTER:- 1090010 LAC NICHOLLS COMM’ FLT.BAF.RAF.RMF.

I would love to know more detailed information as to uncle Herbert and uncle Franks whereabouts and any battles they may have fought in.

I am sorry , but I didn't notice the British Legion link at the top of the page! It doesn't show on the message pages, just on the main page. I do apologise . I will be sending you a big donation! I'm sure my cousin, Carol will be donating too!

Again A BIG THANKYOU!

Kindest Regards,
Margaret
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 2nd July 2016 at 11:03 PM

Dear Margaret,
Thank you for offering to make a donation to the Royal British Legion. It does make a difference. I have to emphasise that I research the First World War and not the Second World War, so am I am not an authority on the latter. There can be no websites that provide individual information about soldiers from the Second World War as the British Army records after 1921 are covered by the UK Data Protection Act and privacy laws and are not in the public domain. There are a few specialist sites that are limited to those who served in specific regiments which do provide biographical information. War Diaries of units in the 1939-1945 conflict can be viewed at Kew by visiting The National Archives at Kew, Surrey.
The information about Gunner Nichols and 55 LAA Regiment R.A. was taken from a book: “Orders of Battle of the Second World War” by Lt-Col H.F. Jolsen; H.M.S.O.; reprinted by Naval and Military Press. So, again, no website. It does not deal with the Navy or R.A.F..
It is not possible to comment on Herbert Nicholls as there is no evidence of which battalion he served in.
Frank Nicholls could have served in 223 Squadron RAF in the Central Mediterranean Force. LAC was the rank of Leading Aircraftsman. I am sorry I can’t help you further as I do not have access to written records of RAF units of the Second World War although many of them do have websites.
I apologise for stressing I do not research the Second World War in your reply on this forum, but if I don’t make it clear the internet will inundate me with requests I can’t answer.
With Kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Margaret
Date: Sunday 3rd July 2016 at 8:57 AM

Good Morning Alan,
Maybe a trip to Kew would be my best bet! My father is 87 and was the youngest of his family. His memory comes and goes but I do seem to remember him saying uncle Frank was quite high up or within a specialised field of some kind in the RAF. Dad was still a young boy when his brothers all went off to war. He does remember where they were sent overseas so maybe I should start researching WW2 War Diaries to find out more detailed information on Frank and Herbert. I do understand that you cannot help with WW2 and do appreciate all the information you have given me so far. You have been of great assistance and I can't thank you enough. I will be in touch again quite soon as there are a few more WW1 soldiers on my mothers side that I would like to research.
Thank you once again Alan,
Kindest Regards,
Margaret
Posted by: Dave Cox {Email left}
Location: Bedford
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 4:09 PM
Hi I am trying to find out where on the front my great uncle Albert William church born 1898 Bedford he joined Norfolk regiment 1916 until 1919
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 7:19 PM

Dear Dave,
Albert William Church was compulsorily conscripted in June 1916 just after his 18th birthday and was eventually called-up and mobilized on 3rd January 1917. He joined the Norfolk Regiment with the regimental number 27194 and after basic training was sent to France, sailing from Folkestone to Boulogne on 28th September 1917. He was at 17 Infantry Base Depot for a short period before being posted to the 7th Battalion Norfolk Regiment which had been in France since May 1915 with the 12th (Eastern) Division.
In October 1917, the 7th Battalion Norfolk Regiment was with 12th Division in the area of Arras to the east of Monchy le Preux prior to moving to Cambrai in November. On 30th November 1917 Albert Church was wounded in the head during the German advance at Cambrai on that day. He was treated at No16 (USA) General Hospital at Le Treport. That hospital had been taken over from the British by the Americans on 10th June 1917 when Base Hospital No.10 from Philadelphia took over. A month later Albert had recovered and he returned to the 7th Battalion on Christmas Day 1917. The actions of the 12th Division in 1918 can be seen at Chris Baker’s website, The Long, Long Trail:
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/12th-eastern-division/
As Albert Church had been in France for a comparatively short time he was retained abroad in order to enable long-serving men to return home. Albert was posted to 320 Prisoner of War Company guarding prisoners on 17th April 1919. He joined 320 Company on 20th May 1919.
He returned to the UK on 28th October 1919 and was discharged on 25th November 1919.
He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Dave Cox
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 7:27 PM

Hi Alan
Thank you so much for this information it has answered all the questions about great uncle Albert
Posted by: Shirley {No contact email}
Location: Gloucester
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 2:57 PM
Hello wondered if any one can help me please looking to find out where my father in law served in ww1his name was William Benfield born 1898 in Wiltshire he was in RG artillery he service no was 126087 would love to know where he fought so I could tell his 1 remaining son my husband and his 2 daughters he died in 1982 thank you
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 7:19 PM

Dear Shirley,
An army medal roll dated in 1920 showed William Benfield had been awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal while serving with 127 Anti-Aircraft Section Royal Garrison Artillery. These anti-aircraft sections were formed in 1917 but I can find no record of 127 Section. Interestingly, 124, 125 and 126 Sections fought in Palestine in 1918, but I cannot find a reference to 127 Section anywhere. There is an article about the Anti-Aircraft sections at: http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/development-of-british-anti-aircraft-artillery-in-the-first-world-war/
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Shirley
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 8:26 PM

Dear Alan thank you so much got this information I'll will try the other web site you suggested I would just love to find out a bit more about as he served in ww2 as well and we know he was in the Middle East for that 1 he was a lovely family man that's enough of my rambling , thank you very much indeed Shirley
Posted by: Anne {No contact email}
Location: Manchester
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 10:59 AM
Hi,
I have my father's army number 3452300 and know he was in the Lancashire Fusiliers and returned injured from dunkirk his name was John Travis are you able to offer any help please.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 7:17 PM

Dear Anne,
Records of soldiers who served in the Second World War are not in the public domain and are held by the Ministry of Defence. They may release details to the next-of-kin on application and payment of a fee. See:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records#service-records-of-deceased-service-personnel
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Anne {No contact email}
Location: Manchester
Date: Friday 1st July 2016 at 10:41 AM
Hi,
I have my father's army number 3452300 and know he was in the Lancashire Fusiliers and returned injured from dunkirk his name was John Travis are you able to offer any help please.

The forum has 315 pages containing 3146 messages
-10   Prev Page   17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25   Next Page   10+

Don't forget to Save this page to your FAVORITES.