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Posted by: Judith Lowe {Email left}
Location: Prescot
Date: Sunday 27th November 2016 at 9:22 PM
Dear Alan,
Thank you so much for the information provided on Private Laws and Corporal Woolnough . I have one more request and this is for a good friend of mine who is trying to find some information out about her Father. He was:
Percy Herbert Mc Donnell 65251 of the Lancashire Fusiliers.
Anything that you can find out about him would make her a very happy this Christmas
I think that we are at the end of the soldiers who signed the Autograph Book now and after, Christmas we will be meeting to discuss our next move. I will be in contact again soon. Thank you so much for all your help
Kind regards
Judith Lowe
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 28th November 2016 at 6:25 PM

Dear Judith,
No individual service record has survived for Percy Herbert McDonnell so it is not possible to state his wartime service. An Army medal roll recorded he had served as an acting corporal with the 17th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers and qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star he did not go overseas until some date after January 1st 1916. The 17th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers was raised at Bury in December 1914 and went to France on 29th January 1916, but there is no record to show whether Percy McDonnell was with them from the beginning or was part of a later draft of reinforcements. The Battalion served with 35th Division. Their engagements can be seen on Chris Baker’s website, The Long, Long Trail:
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/35th-division/
The Battalion’s war diary can be downloaded (£3.45) from:
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7353963
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Judith Lowe {Email left}
Location: Prescot
Date: Friday 25th November 2016 at 11:00 AM
Dear Alan,
We are nearly there now with I think only three more soldiers that we can hope to find any information about:
The first two are:
1. Private W Laws - 2nd Durham Light Infantry
2. Captain W Woolnough - Royal Irish Fusiliers
Both these men were in Rainhill in May 1915

Thank you so much for the information on Blades and Tulip, it made interesting reading.

Regards

Judith
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Friday 25th November 2016 at 5:23 PM

Dear Judith,
There is no record of a Captain W. Woolnough. In 1915 it would have been wholly inappropriate for a commissioned officer to be treated alongside other ranks. W. Woolnough was Corporal Wallace Wentworth Woolnough, 9558, a Regular Army soldier with the 2nd Battalion Princess Victoria’s Royal Irish Fusiliers. He enlisted on 8th January 1907 aged 17. The 2nd Battalion was serving at Firozpur in India in 1907. At the outbreak of war, the Battalion was at Quetta and sailed for England in October 1914 to join 27th Division at Winchester on 20th November 1914. Wallace landed in France on 19th December 1914 and moved with the Battalion to the Ypres sector in Flanders. They took part in the action at St Eloi (14th - 15th March 1915) and the Second Battle of Ypres. Wallace was wounded in the battle for Hill 60.
He was discharged from the Army because of his wounds on 17th December 1915.
Wallace Woolnough qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was granted a silver War Badge for being wounded.
Wallace Woolnough was born in Chelsea in 1889, the son of a house-painter and paper-hanger, William Woolnough and his wife, Elizabeth. In the 1901 census the family was recorded at Stanley Road, Fulham.
*
It has not been possible to identify a W. Laws in the 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry. However, there was a Private M. Laws, 8382, who served in the 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry who was wounded in 1915. This was Matthew Laws, who enlisted on 16th October 1903 as a Regular Army soldier. During the war he went to France with the 2nd D.L.I. on 8th September 1914, landing at St Nazaire on the Loire River estuary. The Battalion served with the 6th Division and was first engaged in the actions on the Aisne heights on 20th September 1914 before moving to Flanders and the ensuing stalemate in the trenches. They were heavily involved at Hooge near Ypres during the Second Battle of Ypres (22 April – 25 May 1915).
After convalescing, Matthew Laws was transferred to the Northumberland Fusiliers, 30670. He was discharged from the Army through sickness on 14th December 1918. He was aged 37 in 1918. It has not been possible to positively identify him, although a Matthew Laws born on 8th December 1914 died in County Durham in 1975, aged 94.
With kind regards,
Alan

Posted by: Judith Lowe {Email left}
Location: Prescot
Date: Wednesday 23rd November 2016 at 9:31 PM
Dear Alan,
Thank you so much for the information about soldiers Cole and Galway. So very quick in replying and so interesting:
Two more soldiers that we are interested in, both from Durham Light Infantry are:
1. Private J T Tulip, 6th Durham L I
2. Private J R Blades 6th Durham L I

They were in the Convalescent Home in Rainhill in May 1915

Regards Judy
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Thursday 24th November 2016 at 9:35 PM

Dear Judith,
J.T. Tulip was Private John Thomas Tulip, 6/2599, of the 6th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. This was a Territorial Army battalion into which John Tulip enlisted on 30th September 1914, aged 25. He sailed with the Battalion for Boulogne on the night of 19th / 20th April 1915 and travelled up to Ypres where he was thrown into the fighting immediately at the Battle of St. Julien (24th April – 5th May) followed by the Battle of Frezenberg (8th – 13th May) during the Second Battle of Ypres which was fought from 22nd April – 25th May 1915 to gain control of the Belgian town.
After his convalescence, John Tulip was posted to the 27th Battalion (Home Service) D.L.I. which was at St. Osyth until April 1917 when it moved to the Isle of Thanet. John was discharged from there on 7th November 1917 as no longer physically fit for war service. He was aged 28 in November 1917.
There were two men named John Thomas Tulip who were born in County Durham, one in the last quarter of 1889 and the other in the second quarter of 1890. The latter would have reached his 28th birthday in mid-1918, so it would appear Private John Thomas Tulip of the 6th D.L.I. came from Seaham Harbour, the son of Thomas and Phyllis Tulip. In the 1911 census John was recorded as a wetter-off in a bottle works living with his parents at 3b Gallery Row, Seaham Harbour. He appears to have married Agnes Bygate in April-June 1914.
He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was granted a silver War Badge for being wounded.
*
There was more than one soldier named J.R. Blades who served in the Durham Light Infantry but only one was listed at the same date at John Thomas Tulip. He was Private 1458 John Richard Blades of the 6th Battalion D.L.I.. John Blades, a quarry worker of 12, West Terrace, Stanhope, Co. Durham, enlisted in the 6th D.L.I. on 22nd January 1912, aged 17 for part-time Territorial Army service. He was born at Wolsingham, Co. Durham on 8th May 1894 the son of Isaac and Jane Blades of Wolsingham.
His early wartime service was the same as Pte Tulip’s: he sailed with the Battalion for Boulogne and travelled up to Ypres where he was thrown into the fighting immediately at the Battle of St. Julien (24th April – 5th May). John Blades was in battle for a week as he received a slight gunshot wound to the leg on 28th April 1915. He returned to hospital in England on 5th May 1915.
He went overseas again on 1st October 1915 and re-joined the 6th D.L.I.. On 27th June 1916 he accidentally stabbed his face with a bayonet while on duty in the trenches. A “trivial” wound was treated in hospital and he was not held to blame. He was wounded a second time on 5th June 1917 when he was hit severely in the right leg. He returned to England on 16th August 1917 from hospital in Rouen and was transferred to Fazakerley Hospital, Liverpool. After this wound had healed, John Blades spent December 1917 and January 1918 at a convalescent depot at Ripon, Yorkshire and then at Blackpool. He was posted to the 5th (Reserve) Battalion D.L.I. at Sutton on Hull on 20th August 1918 and remained in England until February 1919 when he was demobilized.
John Richard Blades qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
He died in 1965, aged 71.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Judith Lowe {Email left}
Location: Prescot
Date: Tuesday 22nd November 2016 at 8:56 AM
Good Morning Alan
Yor swift reply about soldiers Greetham and Lockwood proved interesting reading. Thank you very much.
Two further soldiers of interest to us are:
1. Private J Cole of The Northumberland Fusiliers
2. Private Galway of 2nd K.O. Lancs Regiment. They were injured before May 1915.
Many thanks in anticipation

Judith Lowe
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Tuesday 22nd November 2016 at 5:31 PM

Dear Judith,
There were two men named J. Cole of the Northumberland Fusiliers who were both listed in casualty lists in August 1915. One was John Cole, 8494, a pre-war Special Reservist, who served from 11th August 1914 and then joined the 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from 6th March 1915. and went on to serve in the Durham Light Infantry (52337) until he was demobilized on 3rd April 1919.
The other was listed as J. Cole, 2745, 6th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. It has not been possible to further identify him.
*
Private Galway of the 2nd Battalion King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment was Thomas Galway, 3071, who enlisted in the regiment on 14th August 1914 and was sent to join the 2nd Battalion in France and Flanders on 18th March 1915. They were fighting in the Second Battle of Ypres from 22nd April to 25th May 1915. Thomas Galway appears to have been the same Thomas Galway who was a former militiaman with the Royal Lancaster Regiment in 1906. He was born in 1878 at Barrow in Furness, the son of Alexander and Ellen Galway. He went on to serve in the Devonshire Regiment (38467) the Labour Corps (172042) and the Royal Engineers (286166). He was discharged through sickness on 25th March 1918. He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Joe Freaney {No contact email}
Location: Ireland
Date: Monday 21st November 2016 at 2:51 PM
Hi Alan

Once again, thank you so much for all the fantastic information you have provided recently. FYI, I have recently made a small donation to your chosen charity.

I would be much obliged if you could check out another George Doherty, No 42465, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

Regards

Joe
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 21st November 2016 at 7:53 PM

Dear Joe,
No individual service record has survived for George Doherty so it is not possible to state his wartime service. The Army medal rolls recorded he served as a private soldier initially with the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (11274) then the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (42465) followed by an unidentified battalion of the Royal Munster Fusiliers (35355). Each of the regimental numbers is a typical war-service five-digit number. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for service overseas before December 31st 1915, he did not go abroad until some date after January 1st 1916. He appears to have survived the war.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Judith Lowe {Email left}
Location: Prescot
Date: Monday 21st November 2016 at 2:48 PM
Dear Alan
Thank you so much for the work you have done on Thomas and Lilliot. All this is brilliant information about our soldiers who convalesced at Oakdene Hospital.2 more of our soldiers are:
1. H Greethany?? B. S. Y ?? R.F.A. 22nd November 1915
2. Corp. A. Lockwood - 2nd Manchester Regiment

Any information will be wonderful.

Regards
Judith Lowe
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Monday 21st November 2016 at 8:52 PM

Dear Judith,
H Greethany?? B. S. Y ?? R.F.A. – Surnames beginning with Greet were Greet, Greetham and Greethurst. The latter is rare so the surname was probably Greetham. B.S.Y. would probably be B.S.M. while R.F.A. is Royal Field Artillery.
There was a Henry John Greetham who was a Battery Sergeant Major (B.S.M.) in the Royal Field Artillery who entered Egypt on 19th July 1915 and probably served at Gallipoli shortly afterwards. In the 1911 Census he was recorded as a 28-year-old married corporal in 144th Battery R.F.A. at Wellington Lines, Aldershot. The Battery was stationed at Carlow and Ballinrobe, Ireland, in 1908 and had returned to Woolwich by 1914.
Henry John Greetham was born on June 12th 1882, the son of Henry Augustus Greetham, a bookseller, and his wife, Alice, of 25 Queen Street, St Marylebone. He was baptised on 7th January 1883 at St Luke’s, Marylebone. He had married Clara Louisa Brigg at St Ann’s Church, Tottenham on April 11th 1903, which was the Saturday between Good Friday and Easter Sunday. He was a 22-year-old bachelor of the Royal Artillery.
After being at Oakdene he returned to service but was reduced to the rank of sergeant on 1st November 1918 for inefficiency. He served until his term of engagement was time expired on 5th August 1921.
He qualified for the 1914-15 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal. It has not been possible to state where he served throughout the war.
It appears his first wife, Clara Louisa, died in 1925. Henry then married Edith Holloway in 1925. They had the White Hart Inn the village of Burbage, in Wiltshire, not far from Salisbury Plain. Henry John Greetham died on 25th August 1930, aged 48.
*
A casualty list published in the ‘Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser’ on Friday 28th May 1915 included 16 names from the 2nd Battalion The Manchester Regiment, among them Lockwood, 2742, Acting Corporal (©Local World Ltd via British Newspaper Archive). Lockwood 2742 was Albert Lockwood of the Manchester Regiment. He went overseas on 16th March 1915 and would have been part of a draft of reinforcements to the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment which was already in Flanders with the 5th Division. The Division fought at the second Battle of Ypres and notably in The Battle of Hill 60 (17th April – 7th May 1915) that took place near Hill 60 south of Ypres. After being at Oakdene he was transferred to the Labour Corps (375365). It has not been possible to identify his service in the Labour Corps. Albert Lockwood was demobilized on 11th February 1919 and qualified for the 1914-15 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Cheryl Scott {Email left}
Location: Scotland
Date: Sunday 20th November 2016 at 8:46 PM
Hi, on clearing out my father in laws house following his death we came upon some medals from , i assume, his father. there are 4 medals , one is the bronze mons star, the victory medal and the British war medal. the last has Afghanistan 1919 with the crowned Kaiser head on it. Ive managed to work these out but I cant find any history of the chap, the info on the back of the mons star is 3437 pte R W Scott. 5-D GDS. Im really interested to see if anything could be found out about him from that please as my daughter and I play in a RBL pipe band which is going to visit the battlefields next year, I would like to be able to tell her some personal history . Thank you in anticipation :) cheryl
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th November 2016 at 11:10 PM

Dear Cheryl,
This was Richard William Scott. No individual service record has survived for him so it is not possible to state his wartime service. The Army medal rolls recorded he first served with the Princess Charlotte of Wales’s 5th Dragoon Guards and went to France on 14th October 1915. The regiment had gone to France on 16th August 1914 with the 1st Cavalry Brigade, so Richard would have been part of a draft of reinforcements. He ended the war as Private 101313 in the Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry). His squadron in the M.G.C. is not identified but Chris Baker’s website, The Long, Long Trail, states that No 1 Squadron was “formed 28 February 1916 for 1st Cavalry Brigade in 1st Cavalry Division. Machine gun sections taken from 2nd and 5th Dragoon Guards and 11th Hussars”. See:
http://www.1914-1918.net/mgccav.html
See also:
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/order-of-battle-of-divisions/1st-cavalry-division/
In Afghanistan, William served with 15th Squadron Machine Gun Corps.
“15th Squadron was part of the 6th (Poona) Cavalry Brigade and was formed from (originally) the MG Sections of the 14th Hussars, 21 Cavalry and 22 Cavalry. It went back to India in July 1918, [although there were some men in Mesopotamia in October 1918]. Most of the Indian machine gunners were replaced by men of MGC (Cavalry) sent out from the UK.” (http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/Machine_Gun_Corps)
The Afghan Medal is the India General Service Medal with clasp for “Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919” (North West Frontier). William was transferred to the Reserve on 21st February 1920.
The British maintained troops on the former North West Frontier of India where the Khyber Pass led to and from Afghanistan, through mountains threatened by rival tribes. The collapse of Russia and the rise of Bolshevism in Russia led to a substantial British and Indian force being deployed in the region to secure the Indian frontier in 1919. The medal bears on the reverse the fort of Jamrud which commands the Khyber Pass eleven miles from Peshawar, now in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. The obverse had the head of King George V of Britain with the legend Georgius V Kaisar - I - Hind which was the title "Emperor of India" in the vernacular of the Hindi and Urdu languages.
After 1920, William’s contact address was recorded as Hare Moss, Selkirk.
With kind regards,
Alan
Reply from: Cheryl Scott
Date: Friday 25th November 2016 at 10:55 AM

Wow ! thank you so much- you are good ! i struggled to find the ribbon colours :/ !
I'll let my husband see this as well as the children :)
Posted by: Young Buzzard {Email left}
Location: Newton Abbot
Date: Sunday 20th November 2016 at 12:10 PM
Hello Alan,
Can you help me to understand the service in the Royal Navy of William James Pengilley No 310762 born in Ashburton 27.8.1887. He seems to have enlisted for 12 years in September 1906 but I don't know if he completed this service or if he left and then re-enlisted at the beginning of the Great War?. Thank you in anticipation for your help.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Sunday 20th November 2016 at 6:55 PM

Dear David,
William James Pengilley left the Royal Navy on 6th April 1908, despite having signed-on for 12 years in 1906. His discharge “Whither and for what Cause” was ‘shore purchase’ which meant he was discharged to shore by purchase. Those men who wished to purchase their discharge and were of good character and could show sufficient cause for the request were allowed to do so.
From the England census, William appears to have been illegitimate, living with a single mother. A “natural born” William James Pengilley, whose mother was Mrs Pengilley, Orley House, Ashburton, Devon, England, had emigrated to Australia. He enlisted on 11th January 1915 and served as a private, 1419, with the 15th Infantry Battalion A.I.F. embarking on 13th February 1915 at Brisbane on HMAT A48 “Seang Bee” (His Majesty's Australian Transport, leased from Lim Chin Tsong, Rangoon). William was wounded at Gallipoli and he was returned to Australia on 29th July 1915. You can view digital images of his service record at:
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/explore/defence/service-records/
Click on World War 1 and then World War One Service Records. Name Search by surname; click or tap on “display” results; click on the correct file and then “view digital image” in the top right corner.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Alan Grundy {No contact email}
Location: Lincolnshire
Date: Saturday 19th November 2016 at 4:03 PM
Hello Alan,
I am wondering if you may be able to shed some light on the owner of a Victory Medal which my cousin found at North Thoresby which is near Grimsby in Linc's. He was Private Herbert B Land, Nnumber M2/194472 of the Royal Army Service Corps. This Medal was discovered using a Metal Detector in a field which is going to be built on. Thankyou for your help again.
Alan.
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 19th November 2016 at 10:23 PM

Dear Alan,
No individual service record has survived for Herbert Land so it is not possible to state his wartime service. The Army medal rolls recorded he was Herbert Bert Land. He qualified for the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. As he did not qualify for the 1914-15 Star for overseas service before December 31st 1915, he did not serve abroad until 1916 or later. The M2 prefix to his regimental number indicated he was in the Mechanical Transport branch of the Army Service Corps. He would have trained a Grove Park in London before going overseas.
A Herbert Bertie Land was born in 1887 at Kilburn in London and was recorded in the 1911 census as a locomotive fireman lodging with a G.W.R. engine driver at 75 Medina Road, Greet, Birmingham, Warwickshire, the home of Jane Bishop, a lodging house keeper.
Herbert survived the war.
With kind regards,
Alan
Posted by: Judith Lowe {Email left}
Location: Prescot
Date: Friday 18th November 2016 at 2:21 PM
Dear Alan
Thaks so much for the information about the last two soldiers I sent to you. I received your reply last evening.
Two more soldiers that we are interested in are:
1. Lefe H Thomas 6907 2nd The Buffs. Wounded at Ypres May 2nd 1915

2. Frank L Lilliott?? Lilbolt?? 3rd Rifle Brigade. Very uncertain about this surname.

Any information will be most gratefully received
Kind Regards

Judith Lowe
Reply from: Alan Greveson
Date: Saturday 19th November 2016 at 12:46 PM

Dear Judith,
The Dover Express of Friday 4th June 1915 listed Pte H. Thomas 6907 of The Buffs among the wounded (© Trinity Mirror via British Newspaper Archive). This was Lance-corporal Henry Thomas who had enlisted originally in the Royal West Kent Militia at the Barracks, Maidstone, in November 1898. Henry was 5ft 6ins tall; with a fresh complexion; blue eyes and brown hair.
Henry was born in 1880 at Bredgar, Sittingbourne, Kent, the son of William and Susannah Thomas. From the Militia he served with the Royal West Kent Regiment (6452) on Malta from 4th January 1900 to 9th June 1901. He served with the 1st Battalion The Buffs (6907) from 28th March 1903 to 5th March 1910 when he transferred to the Reserve. He re-engaged with The Buffs at their Depot at Canterbury on 5th March 1914. He was with their Special Reserve and was mobilised on 5th August 1914 moving to Dover. He was posted to the 2nd Battalion The Buffs on 26th December 1914 three days after they had returned to England from India. The 2nd Battalion had been stationed in Wellington, Madras, and sailed from Bombay on 16th November 1914 and landing at Plymouth on December 23rd 1914. The Battalion then joined 28th Division at Winchester and sailed from Southampton for Havre on January 17th 1915. They fought at the Second Battle of Ypres 22nd April – 25th May 1915.
Henry Thomas was appointed a Lance-corporal on 16th April 1915, although his official rank remained as a Private. On 3rd May 1915 he received gunshot wounds to the head and breast. He was returned to the UK on 11th May 1915.
He was administered by the 3rd Battalion The Buffs at Dover from 25th August 1915 and he was eventually transferred to the Royal West Surrey Labour Company on 2nd March 1917 before being transferred to the Labour Corps (126725) where he joined 301st Reserve Labour Company at Thetford, Norfolk, on 11th May 1915. On 5th July 1917 he was posted to France and stayed at the Labour Corps Base Depot until he was posted as a corporal to 186 Labour Company. Henry was promoted to Sergeant on 6th November 1918. He was transferred to the Reserve on 25th February 1919. His character was “exemplary”.
Sgt Henry Thomas qualified for the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal, and the Victory Medal.
*
Private Frank Lilliott served in the 3rd Battalion The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own) regimental number Z/56, indicating he was a pre-war Special Reservist at the outbreak of war.
He was Frank Lewis (or Louis) Lilliott, born at Notting Hill, London, in 1891 the son of William Lilliott, a paperhanger, and his wife Amy Caroline (née Spinks) of 196, Portobello Road, Kensington, London. Frank became a clerk and at the age of 17 he joined the Territorial Army enlisting in the 10th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (Paddington Rifles). The Paddington Rifles were disbanded on 31 May 1912.
Frank Lilliott joined the Special Reserve of the Rifle Brigade and went to France as part of a draft of reinforcements on 27th October 1914. He served with the 3rd Battalion until he was wounded.
Once recovered, he was posted to the 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade and then the 9th Battalion Rifle Brigade. He was presumed killed in action on or since 3rd May 1917 and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. He qualified for the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
With kind regards,
Alan

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